To view the presentations from IPXII, click on links below.  If the presentation you want isn’t available we do not have authorisation to make them available publically.

Day One – Monday 25 September
Day Two – Tuesday 26 September
Day Three – Wednesday 27 September

Monday 25 September 2017

Session 1 – Looking to the Future of Particle Inhalation & Health

Tools for exposure assessment of nanomaterials: Online exposure scenario library & two-box nano-specific inhalation exposure model. Araceli Sánchez Jiménez IOM, Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Inhaled ultrafine particulate matter affects microglial morphology and learning and memory behavior in an Alzheimer’s disease mouse model. Alison Elder, Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester, Rochester, U.S.A.

Online detection of the oxidative potential of ambient particulate matter by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Bryan Hellack, Institute of Energy and Environmental Technology (IUTA) e.V., Duisburg, Germany

Session 2 – New Approaches in Inhaled Particles: Exposure & Hazard Assessment

Development of samplers for aerosol fractions deposited in two regions of the respiratory tract – gas-exchange region and posterior head airways. Göran Lidén, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden

Method Development for Toxicity Screening with Exposure Route relevance: Initial Progress. Gail Drummond, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, United Kingdom

Pulmonary toxicity of surface modified copper oxide nanoparticles. Ilse Gosens, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, Netherlands

Session 3 – New Approaches in Inhaled Particles: Exposure & Hazard Assessment

Are dust samplers and analytical techniques keeping up with lower concentrations and OELs?
Experiences from the European Industrial Minerals Sector.  Hicham Zilaout, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Division of Environmental Epidemiology,Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands

Scale of Health: Indices of Safety and Efficacy in the Evolving Environment of Nanoparticle Toxicology.  Christie M. Sayes, Baylor University, Waco, U.S.A.

Comparing nanomaterial toxicity with lung cells cultured under air-liquid interface and submerged conditions. Yaobo Ding, Institute of Lung Biology and Disease, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Munich, Germany

Session 4 – Low Toxicity Particles – Exposures, Health Impact & Regulation

Significance of Agglomerate Aerosol and Particle Densities for Effects and Mechanisms of Inhaled Particles. Günter Oberdörster, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, U.S.A.

Exposure assessment in a factory of barium sulfate particles. Gaku Ichihara, Tokyo University of Science, Noda, Japan

First Results of a Long-term Inhalation Study with nano Barium sulfate.  Lan Ma-Hock, Experimental Toxicology and Ecology, BASF SE, Ludwigshafen/Rhein, Germany

Long-term Inhalation Study with Nano Ceria – Histopathology of the Lung.  Dirk Schaudien Fraunhofer, Institute for Toxicology and Experimental Medicine ITEM, Hannover, Germany

Surface area is the biologically most relevant dose metric for nanoparticle-induced inflammation in the lung.  Otmar Schmid, Comprehensive Pneumology Center, 81377 Munich, Germany

Announcement – Particle and Fibre Toxicology – Paper of the Year

Flemming R Cassee

Session 5 – Debate on the Classification of TiO2 as a Human Carcinogen

David Warheit, The Chemours Company, Wilmington, DE, U.S.A.
Thomas Gebel, Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Dortmund, Germany

Tuesday 26 September 2017

Session 6 – Outdoor Air Pollution

Keynote: The influence of source and chemistry on the toxicity of ambient particulate matter. Ian Gilmour, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S.A.

Characteristics of intermittent exposures to fine particulate matters: implications on exposure assessment. Yen-Yu Liu, NKFUST, Kaohsiung, Taiwan

Conceptual models of ultrafine particles from combustion sources – Benefits from integrating studies of ultrafine particles with nanotoxicology. Joakim Pagels, Ergonomics & Aerosol Technology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden

Aggregated Exposure Estimates for Fine Particulate Matter from Indoor and Outdoor Sources. Miranda Loh, Institute of Occupational Medicine, Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Respiratory hazard identification of combined exposure to gasoline exhaust and respirable volcanic ash in a multicellular human lung model. Ines Tomašek, Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience, Department of Earth Sciences, Durham University, Durham, United Kingdom. BioNanomaterials group, Adolphe Merkle Institute, University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland

Session 7 – Traffic-related Particulates

In silico analysis of phthalate exposure associated with urban particulate matter in the central region of Mexico City. Ernesto Alfaro-Moreno, Swedish Toxicology Sciences Research Center, Södertälje, Sweden

Chemical composition and toxicological properties of ambient particles (PM0.25) from near-airport and urban road traffic sites. Flemming R. Cassee, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands. National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, Netherlands

Biologically reactive constiuents of combustion-derived particulate matter: Pro-inflammatory effects in lung epithelial and vascular endothelial cells. Johan Øvrevik, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway

Generating biodiesel and fossil diesel exhaust particles with varied physico-chemical properties for toxicological studies. Louise Gren, Ergonomics & Aerosol Technology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden

Session 8 – Particle Toxicology: Pathways to Disease

Keynote: ‘Omics’ and Adverse Outcome Pathways: tools for risk assessment of nanomaterials. Sabina Halappanavar, Department of Biology, Univeristy of Ottawa, Canada

Development of an adverse outcome pathway based on toxicogenomic data for ENM-induced risk of developing
atherosclerotic plaques.  Ulla Vogel, National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark

Long-fibre Carbon Nanotubes and Asbestos induce Pleural Pathology with a Common Molecular Signature. Tatyana Chernova, MRC Toxicology Unit, Leicester, United Kingdom

Inhaled multi-walled carbon nanotubes-induced gene expression profile in rat lung. Carole Seidel, INRS, Vandoeuvre les Nancy, France

Session 9 – Mineral Fibers

End user exposure from the use of asbestos cement and other asbestos products. Michael Kottek, Ocean Grove, Australia

Monitoring and assessment of exposure to elongate mineral particles and fibres. Garry Burdett, Health and Safety Laboratory, Buxton, United Kingdom

Investigating the in vitro toxicity of after-service man-made vitreous fibres.  Matthew Boyles, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Assessment of the consequences of increasing life expectancy on mesothelioma deaths and the risks associated with current and future exposures. Robin Howie, Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Jefferson Parish, Louisiana: A follow-up of America’s largest current mesothelioma epidemic.  Bruce Case, McGill University, Montreal, Canada

Session 10 – Posters

Wednesday 27 September 2017

Session 11 – Lung Exposure and Beyond

Keynote: Nano-exposure Driven Risk Assessment. Paul Westerhoff, Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering, Arizona State University, AZ, U.S.A

Nanomaterial dosimetry in inhalation toxicology: Bridging the gaps between in-vitro and in-vivo models as well as real world exposure.  Otmar Schmid, Comprehensive Pneumology Center, 81377 Munich, Germany. Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, 85764, Neuherberg/Munich, Germany

Metal concentrations in urine samples of welder apprentices. Bernadette Quemerais, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada

Translocation and fate of inhaled gold nanoparticles in mice and man. Jennifer Raftis, University of Edinburgh., Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Session 12 – Respiratory Protection

Keynote: Respiratory Protection from Workplace to Beyond. Miranda Loh, Institute of Occupational Medicine, Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Particulate exposure, respiratory protection and ill-health following the Fort McMurray fire of May 2016.  Nicola Cherry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada

Testing the effectiveness of respiratory protection used to prevent inhalation of volcanic ash: filtration efficiency experiments.  Claire Horwell, Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience, Department of Earth Sciences, Durham University, Durham, United Kingdom

An assessment of facial dimensions and their impact on mask performance. Thomas Winski, Institute of Occupational Medicine, Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Session 13 – Nanotoxicology

Toxicity of different types of layered silicates.  Krystyna Maciaszek, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Nanoparticles and persistent virus infection – a dangerous liaison for the development of chronic lung disease(s)? Tobias Stoeger, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Comprehensive Pneumology Center, Institute of Lung Biology and Disease, Munich, Germany

Nanomaterial-induced Pulmonary Acute Phase Response Constitutes a Causal Link between Inhalation of Nanomaterials and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease.  Ulla Vogel, National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark

Protein coating determines the cellular responses in the abdominal cavity after graphene oxide administration. Artur Filipe Rodrigues, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom

Session 14 – Indoor Air Pollution

The impact of e-cigarettes and tobacco heating products on indoor air quality. John McAughey, British American Tobacco, Southampton, United Kingdom

Proposed method to assign respirators to workers exposed to airborne biological contaminants from human, animal and plant waste processing operations. Stephen Larson, Tufts university, Boston, USA . Keene state college, keene, U.S.A.

Fine and ultrafine particles from indoor sources – Physico-chemical characterization. Bryan Hellack, Institute of Energy and Environmental Technology (IUTA) e.V., Duisburg, GermanyEPIA project_

Fine and ultrafine particles from indoor sources – Physico-chemical characterization. Bryan Hellack, Institute of Energy and Environmental Technology (IUTA) e.V., Duisburg, GermanyEPIA project_

Session 15 – Future Priorities in Inhaled Particles

Keynote: Filtration Solutions to Mitigate PM2.5 Pollutants in Urban Air. David Pui, Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, U.S.A.

Round up of key points raised during the symposium and open discussion

Closing Remarks & Awards